clock menu more-arrow no yes
to of Red Victorian building with shingled roof and spires
Littlefield home
@temple_plaza

12 gorgeous buildings to explore on the UT campus

New ways of seeing the school’s rich artistic and architectural legacy

View as Map
Littlefield home
| @temple_plaza

The University of Texas at Austin has a famously beautiful campus, so to pick 12 of the university’s most beautiful buildings is merely to sample what is really a deep pool of world-class architecture, one that reflects the contemporary design trends and the needs of the university since it was founded in 1883.

(Note: If you love architectural details the way I love architectural details, check out @temple_plaza for photos galore.)

Read More

1. Littlefield Home

Copy Link
Littlefield Home, 302 W 24th St
Austin, TX 78705

This picture-book Victorian home was built in 1893 for UT benefactor Major George Littlefield and his family and was left to the university in 1935 after the death of George’s wife, Alice. The story isn’t always pretty though—as Edmund Gordon, founding chair of UT’s Department of African and African Diaspora Studies, points out in his Racial Geography Tour of campus. A 2012 Daily Texan column, “Building from the University’s racist past,” reminds us that Littlefield was “a Mississippi slave owner and Confederate major who attempted to rewrite the University’s textbooks from a ‘confederate perspective.’” 

2. Mary E. Gearing Hall

Copy Link
200 W 24th St
Austin, TX 78705
(512) 471-0165

A winner from architect Paul Cret, who designed the campus’s master plan. Completed in 1933 as part of the “women’s campus,” Gearing Hall has been the location of the home economics department, later renamed the School of Human Ecology, ever since. A shady, covered patio on the south side gives this building an appropriately domestic feel and provides a great view of the UT Tower through the stunning, wrought-iron courtyard gates. 

3. Texas Memorial Museum

Copy Link
2400 Trinity St
Austin, TX 78705
(512) 471-1604
Visit Website

This Art Deco jewel box of a building was also designed by the ever-tasteful Paul Cret. Fun fact #1: In 1936, President Franklin D. Roosevelt was in Texas campaigning and set off the dynamite for the groundbreaking of the museum. Fun fact #2: The museum’s Great Hall houses a pterosaur skeleton with a wingspan of 36 feet. 

4. Dorothy L. Gebauer Building

Copy Link
116 Inner Campus Drive
Austin, TX 78712
(512) 471-9209
Visit Website

Gebauer opened in 1904 and holds the title of oldest academic building on campus. From 1932 to 1952, it was home to the journalism school where distinguished alumni Liz Carpenter, Walter Cronkite, and Liz Smith honed their writing skills as members of The Daily Texan staff.

5. UT Tower (Main Building)

Copy Link
Main Building, 110 Inner Campus Drive
Austin, TX 78705

When Beaux-Arts-educated architect Paul Cret submitted his master plan for the campus in 1933, his design for the tower was literally and thematically at the center of it all. And now, the tower is easily UT’s most iconic building. Fun fact: Five ancient writing systems are represented on the sides of the tower: Egyptian hieroglyphics plus the Phoenician, Hebrew, Greek, and Latin alphabets.

6. LBJ Presidential Library

Copy Link
2313 Red River St
Austin, TX 78712
(512) 721-0200
Visit Website

Designed by Skidmore, Owings and Merrill and completed in 1971, the LBJ Library is a modernist fortress on the east edge of campus. Enormous in scale, with its monumental, wind-swept terrace, epic staircase, and gorgeous skin of travertine, this is a presidential library with no shortage of drama. Fun facts: LBJ’s presidential limousine is on display in the lobby, and the museum has a 7/8th-scale replica of the Oval Office.

7. Gregory Gymnasium

Copy Link
2101 Speedway
Austin, TX 78712
(512) 471-3116
Visit Website

Florentine Renaissance Revival? I’m just taking a guess here. But I love the pink iron gates, the Juliet balconies, the herringbone brickwork, and the gorgeous iron trusses. And you know what? The squirrels seem to love it too. Some of the best squirrel watching is available on the shaded picnic tables out front. (What? You say that you can’t get enough of the UT squirrels? Check out @squirrels.of.ut on Instagram.)

8. Darrell K Royal-Texas Memorial Stadium

Copy Link
2139 San Jacinto Blvd
Austin, TX 78712
(512) 471-4602
Visit Website

Driving a Fiat at night by Memorial Stadium while listening to Nino Rota is the closest Austinites will get to living La Dolce Vita without traveling to Rome. Our very own “Colosseum,” though not beautiful from every angle, has a gargantuan scale, both inside and out, that is difficult to believe, even when it’s right in front of you.

9. The Perry-Castañeda Library

Copy Link
101 E 21st St
Austin, TX 78712

Brutal is beautiful, right? Especially when you approach these two monoliths from the massive, elevated pedestrian bridge that crosses 21st Street. The courtyard in front of the Perry-Castañeda Library is a great place for grackle watching, and the University Teaching Center has an outdoor escalator.

10. Ellsworth Kelly's ‘Austin’

Copy Link
200 E Martin Luther King Jr Blvd
Austin, TX 78712
(512) 471-5482
Visit Website

Located on the grounds of the Blanton Museum, Austin is the only building that renowned American painter and sculptor Ellsworth Kelly designed. He gifted the design to the Blanton in 2015 and, after funding and construction, it officially opened in February 2018. Although it feels quite a bit like a chapel, Kelly did not intend Austin to be religious.

11. Claudia Taylor Johnson Hall/The University of Texas System

Copy Link
210 W 6th St
Austin, TX 78703

This neoclassical bright spot at Seventh and Lavaca street, a bit south of campus, was originally built as the seventh U.S. Post Office location in Austin. In 1965, the federal government gave the building to the University of Texas System, and it was named in honor of Lady Bird Johnson. The entire block is currently being redeveloped, but CTJ Hall still stands and will be renovated as part of the project. Although the UT Systems administrative offices have moved out of the building, the inscription on the entablature still reads “The University of Texas.”

12. Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center

Copy Link
4801 La Crosse Ave
Austin, TX 78739
(512) 232-0100
Visit Website

Lady Bird once said, “Where flowers bloom, so does hope”—a thought that syncs perfectly with the wildflower center’s mission to inspire the conservation of native plants and promote sustainable landscapes. That said, the sandstone building complex is super-sweet and full of drama-worthy spaces (Pretend you’re Hamlet and deliver your soliloquy from the Observation Tower—or channel your inner Ophelia and wander through the haunting arcades of the aqueduct). The center is about a 10-mile drive south of downtown Austin.

Loading comments...

1. Littlefield Home

Littlefield Home, 302 W 24th St, Austin, TX 78705

This picture-book Victorian home was built in 1893 for UT benefactor Major George Littlefield and his family and was left to the university in 1935 after the death of George’s wife, Alice. The story isn’t always pretty though—as Edmund Gordon, founding chair of UT’s Department of African and African Diaspora Studies, points out in his Racial Geography Tour of campus. A 2012 Daily Texan column, “Building from the University’s racist past,” reminds us that Littlefield was “a Mississippi slave owner and Confederate major who attempted to rewrite the University’s textbooks from a ‘confederate perspective.’” 

Littlefield Home, 302 W 24th St
Austin, TX 78705

2. Mary E. Gearing Hall

200 W 24th St, Austin, TX 78705

A winner from architect Paul Cret, who designed the campus’s master plan. Completed in 1933 as part of the “women’s campus,” Gearing Hall has been the location of the home economics department, later renamed the School of Human Ecology, ever since. A shady, covered patio on the south side gives this building an appropriately domestic feel and provides a great view of the UT Tower through the stunning, wrought-iron courtyard gates. 

200 W 24th St
Austin, TX 78705

3. Texas Memorial Museum

2400 Trinity St, Austin, TX 78705

This Art Deco jewel box of a building was also designed by the ever-tasteful Paul Cret. Fun fact #1: In 1936, President Franklin D. Roosevelt was in Texas campaigning and set off the dynamite for the groundbreaking of the museum. Fun fact #2: The museum’s Great Hall houses a pterosaur skeleton with a wingspan of 36 feet. 

2400 Trinity St
Austin, TX 78705

4. Dorothy L. Gebauer Building

116 Inner Campus Drive, Austin, TX 78712

Gebauer opened in 1904 and holds the title of oldest academic building on campus. From 1932 to 1952, it was home to the journalism school where distinguished alumni Liz Carpenter, Walter Cronkite, and Liz Smith honed their writing skills as members of The Daily Texan staff.

116 Inner Campus Drive
Austin, TX 78712

5. UT Tower (Main Building)

Main Building, 110 Inner Campus Drive, Austin, TX 78705

When Beaux-Arts-educated architect Paul Cret submitted his master plan for the campus in 1933, his design for the tower was literally and thematically at the center of it all. And now, the tower is easily UT’s most iconic building. Fun fact: Five ancient writing systems are represented on the sides of the tower: Egyptian hieroglyphics plus the Phoenician, Hebrew, Greek, and Latin alphabets.

Main Building, 110 Inner Campus Drive
Austin, TX 78705

6. LBJ Presidential Library

2313 Red River St, Austin, TX 78712

Designed by Skidmore, Owings and Merrill and completed in 1971, the LBJ Library is a modernist fortress on the east edge of campus. Enormous in scale, with its monumental, wind-swept terrace, epic staircase, and gorgeous skin of travertine, this is a presidential library with no shortage of drama. Fun facts: LBJ’s presidential limousine is on display in the lobby, and the museum has a 7/8th-scale replica of the Oval Office.

2313 Red River St
Austin, TX 78712

7. Gregory Gymnasium

2101 Speedway, Austin, TX 78712

Florentine Renaissance Revival? I’m just taking a guess here. But I love the pink iron gates, the Juliet balconies, the herringbone brickwork, and the gorgeous iron trusses. And you know what? The squirrels seem to love it too. Some of the best squirrel watching is available on the shaded picnic tables out front. (What? You say that you can’t get enough of the UT squirrels? Check out @squirrels.of.ut on Instagram.)

2101 Speedway
Austin, TX 78712

8. Darrell K Royal-Texas Memorial Stadium

2139 San Jacinto Blvd, Austin, TX 78712

Driving a Fiat at night by Memorial Stadium while listening to Nino Rota is the closest Austinites will get to living La Dolce Vita without traveling to Rome. Our very own “Colosseum,” though not beautiful from every angle, has a gargantuan scale, both inside and out, that is difficult to believe, even when it’s right in front of you.

2139 San Jacinto Blvd
Austin, TX 78712

9. The Perry-Castañeda Library

101 E 21st St, Austin, TX 78712

Brutal is beautiful, right? Especially when you approach these two monoliths from the massive, elevated pedestrian bridge that crosses 21st Street. The courtyard in front of the Perry-Castañeda Library is a great place for grackle watching, and the University Teaching Center has an outdoor escalator.

101 E 21st St
Austin, TX 78712

10. Ellsworth Kelly's ‘Austin’

200 E Martin Luther King Jr Blvd, Austin, TX 78712

Located on the grounds of the Blanton Museum, Austin is the only building that renowned American painter and sculptor Ellsworth Kelly designed. He gifted the design to the Blanton in 2015 and, after funding and construction, it officially opened in February 2018. Although it feels quite a bit like a chapel, Kelly did not intend Austin to be religious.

200 E Martin Luther King Jr Blvd
Austin, TX 78712

11. Claudia Taylor Johnson Hall/The University of Texas System

210 W 6th St, Austin, TX 78703

This neoclassical bright spot at Seventh and Lavaca street, a bit south of campus, was originally built as the seventh U.S. Post Office location in Austin. In 1965, the federal government gave the building to the University of Texas System, and it was named in honor of Lady Bird Johnson. The entire block is currently being redeveloped, but CTJ Hall still stands and will be renovated as part of the project. Although the UT Systems administrative offices have moved out of the building, the inscription on the entablature still reads “The University of Texas.”

210 W 6th St
Austin, TX 78703

12. Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center

4801 La Crosse Ave, Austin, TX 78739

Lady Bird once said, “Where flowers bloom, so does hope”—a thought that syncs perfectly with the wildflower center’s mission to inspire the conservation of native plants and promote sustainable landscapes. That said, the sandstone building complex is super-sweet and full of drama-worthy spaces (Pretend you’re Hamlet and deliver your soliloquy from the Observation Tower—or channel your inner Ophelia and wander through the haunting arcades of the aqueduct). The center is about a 10-mile drive south of downtown Austin.

4801 La Crosse Ave
Austin, TX 78739